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The fine wine market, after uninterrupted months of growth, shows the first signs of a slowdown. In the current situation, marked by the energy crisis, the war in Ukraine and inflation that is growing at rates not seen for decades, the low profitability of the Liv-ex indices in August 2022 should not worry those who regularly invest in the most prestigious labels . Especially if it has decided to focus on the great Italian labels, collected in the Italy 100, which, in the last 12 months, has grown by 15% and, in the last 5 years, even by 46%.

In the long run, in reality, many labels have gone even better, starting with Tignanello 2010, Super Tuscan by Marchesi Antinori whose prices have grown by 119.2% over a five-year period, to 1,710 pounds per case. And again, the Tignanello 2011, up 119.4%, at a current price of 1,360 pounds per case, and the Tignanello 2009, with a growth of 117.7%, for 1,720 pounds per case. Following, in the WineNews analysis (based on Liv-ex data updated to 31 August 2022), the Sassicaia 2012 of Tenuta San Guido, Bolgheri’s landmark, grew by 107.6% to 2,490 pounds per box. Sassicaia 2013 also did well, growing by 104.8% to £ 2,640 per box, and Sassicaia 2010, which made + 104.4% to £ 2,800 per box.

Outside Tuscany, the best performing Italian label of the last five years on the Liv-ex is, on the other hand, the 2009 Gaja Barbaresco, whose prices have grown by 98.5%, to 2,564 pounds. This was followed by Sassicaia 2009, which appreciated by 94.4%, up to £ 2,800 per case, and Sassicaia 2011, at + 94.9%, for £ 2,400 per case. In eighth place the 2013 Tignanello, which, in the space of five years, has gained 93.9%, up to 1,377 pounds per case, doing better than the Solaia 2009, another reference label of the Antinori galaxy, which grew by +92, 8% to 2,660 pounds per box, and the 2012 Tignanello, which grew by + 88.3% to 1,269 pounds per box. Then, Giacomo Conterno’s Barolo Cascina Francia 2008 (+ 85.7% to 2,600 pounds)the 2013 Solaia (+ 77.6% to 2,540 pounds), the 2011 Solaia (+ 74.2% to 2,090 pounds) and the 2011 Gaja Barbaresco (+ 63.4% to 1,618 pounds). And again, among the Italian labels that have most appreciated, in the last five years, Solaia 2012 (+ 63.1% to 2,290 pounds), followed by Masseto 2009 (+ 61% to £ 7,820), Ornellaia 2012 (+ 56.9% to £ 1,710), Ornellaia 2013 (+ 55.8% to £ 1,869) and Masseto 2010 (+54 , 6% at £ 9,441). Then, the Masseto 2012 (+ 54.5% to 7,549 pounds), the Solaia 2010 (+ 50% to 2,550 pounds) and the Ornellaia 2010 (+ 47.3% to 2,380 pounds).

Below the five-year growth of the Italy 100, on the other hand, Barolo Cascina Francia 2012 Giacomo Conterno (+ 43.1% to 2,260 pounds), Ornellaia 2009 (+ 42.9% to 2,000 pounds), Barbaresco 2013 Gaja (+ 40.6% to 1,532 pounds) ) and the Masseto 2011 (+ 33.4% to 6,804 pounds). But also Masseto 2013 (+ 33% to 7,020 pounds), Barolo Cascina Francia 2009 Giacomo Conterno (+ 29.5% to 1,800 pounds), Barolo Cascina Francia 2011 Giacomo Conterno (+ 25.7% to 2,100 pounds), Barbaresco 2010 Gaja (+ 25% to £ 2,150), Barolo Cascina Francia 2010 Giacomo Conterno (+ 19.5% to £ 3,800), Barbaresco 2012 Gaja (+ 14.3% to £ 1,533) and Ornellaia 2011 (+ 13.7% to 1,450 pounds).


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Marco Ribaudo

Marco Ribaudo

For the love of food and wine! Marco Ribaudo, Certified Sommelier, with 25 years in the food and beverage industry now invites you to join him in his latest adventure, the opening of la Cucina del Vino to share his culture and passion for creating unforgettable memories around the table.

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